The project aims to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic solar panels and will be undertaken on approximately 10 per cent of the panels in the UQ Solar array at St Lucia

This research incorporates the first large-scale field test of a prototype device, the SN2100 blocking diode, developed by NYSE-listed National Semiconductors.

The project, which aims to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic solar panels, will be undertaken on about 10 per cent of the panels in the UQ Solar array at St Lucia and involves attaching the diodes to the back of about 250 panels, with an additional 250 panels being used as comparative modules.

The effectiveness and application of the diodes will be monitored under a range of natural and artificial shading conditions, before they are released commercially.

Under the research, parts of the panels will be deliberately shaded to analyse the impact this will have on electricity generation. The shading devices will also cover adjacent panels that do not have the device installed.  This will allow a comparison between the two sets of data to determine the effectiveness of the technology.

Shading Analysis / Smart Modules Research
1412 photovoltaic panels on each of the multi-storey carpark rooftops

System Specification

SN2100 blocking diode, prototype developed by National Semiconductors

Research Contact

UQ Global Change Institute
Phone: +61 7 3433 3100
Email:  gci@uq.edu.au

Industry Partners

Trina Solar, National Semiconductors